How To Mount A New Disk On A Desired Mountpoint

Being an Application or a Database administrator you must have come across a situations many times wherein you would require a mountpoint for some requirements. In this article we’ll ses how it happens step by step.

List the attached disks using fdisk.

[[email protected] ~]# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/xvda: 214.7 GB, 214748364800 bytes, 419430400 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x000cdbad

    Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/xvda1   *        2048     2099199     1048576   83  Linux
/dev/xvda2         2099200   419430399   208665600   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/ol_dbnode1-root: 53.7 GB, 53687091200 bytes, 104857600 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/mapper/ol_dbnode1-swap: 2147 MB, 2147483648 bytes, 4194304 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/mapper/ol_dbnode1-home: 157.8 GB, 157831659520 bytes, 308264960 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/xvdb: 5368 MB, 5368709120 bytes, 10485760 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

In order to use this disk, before we can mount it we will have to create a partition first and then file system.
So let’s create a partiton first.

Select the newly attached which disk you want to mount.

[[email protected] ~]# fdisk /dev/xvdb 
Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.23.2).

Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table
Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xc5005674.

Command (m for help): 

Type m to list all fdisk commands.

Command (m for help): m 
Command action
   a   toggle a bootable flag
   b   edit bsd disklabel
   c   toggle the dos compatibility flag
   d   delete a partition
   g   create a new empty GPT partition table
   G   create an IRIX (SGI) partition table
   l   list known partition types
   m   print this menu
   n   add a new partition
   o   create a new empty DOS partition table
   p   print the partition table
   q   quit without saving changes
   s   create a new empty Sun disklabel
   t   change a partition's system id
   u   change display/entry units
   v   verify the partition table
   w   write table to disk and exit
   x   extra functionality (experts only)

As listed above use n to add a new partition on selected disk.

Command (m for help): n
Partition type:
   p   primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
   e   extended

Select primary using p or just hit enter as p is the default one. Then keep and hitting enter for fdisk to take default first and last sector in order to use entire disk for this partition.

Select (default p): p
Partition number (1-4, default 1): 
First sector (2048-10485759, default 2048): 
Using default value 2048
Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (2048-10485759, default 10485759): 
Using default value 10485759
Partition 1 of type Linux and of size 5 GiB is set

Once the partition is created, save it using w.

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered!

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

The partition is now created, let’s create a file system now.

[[email protected] ~]# mkfs -t ext3 /dev/xvdb1 
mke2fs 1.42.9 (28-Dec-2013)
Filesystem label=
OS type: Linux
Block size=4096 (log=2)
Fragment size=4096 (log=2)
Stride=0 blocks, Stripe width=0 blocks
327680 inodes, 1310464 blocks
65523 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user
First data block=0
Maximum filesystem blocks=1342177280
40 block groups
32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group
8192 inodes per group
Superblock backups stored on blocks: 
	32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736

Allocating group tables: done                            
Writing inode tables: done                            
Creating journal (32768 blocks): done
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done 

File System is also created now. Let’s create a directory and mount our new device.

[[email protected] ~]# mkdir /pg_bin
[[email protected] ~]# mount -t ext3 /dev/xvdb1 /pg_bin/

Verify

[[email protected] ~]# df -hTP | grep pg_bin
/dev/xvdb1                  ext3      4.8G   11M  4.6G   1% /pg_bin

There you go, we have mounted the new disk on /pg_bin mountpoint.

Check this post to see how to add a disk to a running VM.

Peace 🙂